Tag Archives: patents

Like a Tree Falling that No One Hears: AI-generated Disclosures Have the Potential to Block Patentability of Human Ingenuity

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office continues to seek stakeholder input on AI-generated disclosures and patentability. Earlier this year, USPTO issued a public Request for Comment on the impact of artificial intelligence on prior art, the known understanding of a person of ordinary skill and how this effects patentability, specifically novelty and obviousness of a … Continue Reading

Identifying a Single Biomolecule Means Single-molecule Detection Sensitivity

Every single word matters. Nowhere was this truer than when the Federal Circuit recently held, in an appeal from the Patent Trial and Appeal Board captioned Pacific Biosciences of California, Inc. v. Personal Genomics Taiwan, Inc., that an apparatus for identifying a single biomolecule meant examining one biomolecule alone and not inferring its identity from … Continue Reading

Russia Suspends Compulsory License Payments for Some Non-Russians

In the latest example of the escalation of tensions between Russia and the West, Russian Prime Minister Mikhail Mishustin last week issued a decree that owners of Russian patents from countries that Russia considers to be unfriendly are no longer entitled to any compensation for compulsory licensing of their patents. In particular, the decree (translated … Continue Reading

Changes to Improve Chinese Patents

In a blog post published in February 2021 (here), we addressed regulatory initiatives from the Chinese government aimed at moving China from a country dependent on “imported” patents (i.e., patents filed by foreign entities) to a country with great autochthone creativity. The initiatives were intended to reduce or eliminate fraudulent and low-quality patent applications and … Continue Reading

AFCP 2.0 Extended: Your Mileage May Vary

On October 12, 2021, the USPTO extended its program for after-final patent prosecution practice, AFCP 2.0, to September 30, 2022. The USPTO initiated the “pilot” program in 2013, to speed up prosecution and to increase contact between Examiners and applicants. Although the USPTO has not issued statistics about the results of the program, applicants still … Continue Reading

Trial & Error: Violation of MIL Order Not a Per Se Justification for New Trial

The Federal Circuit’s recent opinion in Pacific Biosciences of California, Inc. v Oxford Nanopore Technologies, Inc. et al. reminds us that new trial motions are hard to win, even when the adversary violates a pretrial motion in limine (MIL) order. Rather, the district court judge’s curative instructions and procedures to avoid future violations of a … Continue Reading

Happy Holidays from the USPTO — Or Maybe Not

As it has done in the past, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (“USPTO”) has declared Thursday, December 24, in addition to Friday, December 25, to be a “federal holiday.” The action comes as a result of President Trump’s December 11, 2020 Executive Order extending the traditional Christmas Federal holiday. As a result of this … Continue Reading

Squire Patton Boggs Celebrates World IP Day

Today is World IP Day, a day established by the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) to “learn about the role that intellectual property (IP) rights play in encouraging innovation and creativity.” The theme for 2020 is “Innovation for a Green Future,” and WIPO’s website and magazine contemplate how various IP regimes matter for addressing climate … Continue Reading
LexBlog